New electrical ring main difficulties  

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23/07/2018 12:57 pm  

Guest User Tom 

Just in the process of doing kitchen electrics. Hopefully burying the wires in the board walls prior to plastering. Has anyone had problems in wiring the sockets on the wall below the steel beam over the wall between the kitchen and hallway. Electricians seem to want to run vertical wiring from under the floor above. One electrician has just told me the steel girder gives a difficulty and wanted to surface mount the cabling so the trunking is visible. Obviously I don’t want this.
Any other help in planning wiring routes would help.

Regards
Tom

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Admin
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23/07/2018 12:58 pm  

Morning Tom
The problem with BISF House wiring is that they were not all wired in a stadard format. Wiring kits were originaly provided for each house but even so the wiring arrangements we see inside each property can and does vary.

For example, in many Midlands properties junction boxes were used extensively. I recall on several refurbishment jobs the horror of seeing around a dozen junction boxes secreted into the ceiling area above the kitchen and dining room that resembled a spiders web on steroids.

Junction boxes were commonly used during this time so it is not unsual to post war buildings of this era but I digress from your original question.

The problem faced today under modern wiring regulations does raise a few issues and at this point I must stress that I am by no means a qualified electrician and my last stripdown was undertaken some years ago so much of what I am writing will be from memory.

In the properties that I have worked on the wiring usually ran under the steel joists as the timber floor joists are slotted into the sides of the ibeam tend to be slightly oversized allowing for a 5-10mm gap between the joists and the Ceiling plasterboard. This should provide adequate space under which to run the cables.

I have also know some electricans touse a diamon tipped steel hole cutting bit to drill a small hole through the flat central surface of the ibeam itself allowing for a wiring loom or cables to be passed through with ease. The drilled hole was no more that 30mm in diameter but obviously the smaller the better so as not to reduce the strength of the beam. Obviously the sides of drilled hole would need to be isolated with a rubber grommet to prevent the frame from becoming live.

I hope that others may also contribute to your question but in my view avoid surface mounting at all costs. It was a style of re-wiring used extensively by Councils back in the 90’s and it does not look good.

If you can provide photographs of the exposed beam and the location of the new wiring it would help others to provide a more accurate response.

Best regards

Marc

 
 

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23/07/2018 12:59 pm  

Marc, thanks for this. I had the bathroom floor boards up today and also examined the steel work , I’ll get some photographs . I’ll update this as to how it unfolds. Thanks


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Ed (Senior Member)
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23/07/2018 1:00 pm  

Hi Thomas,

BISF houses were probably wired in a standard way originally, but I think all or almost all will have been rewired at some point by now, and the rewiring will not be standard. Here it looks as though it was done in the cheapest/easiest way with surface mounted conduit, and I agree with Marc that does not look good. The original wiring was insulated with black rubber and was inside the walls (not surface mounted) – I’ve found quite a lot of it cut off inside the walls.

I have been burying the cables in the walls as part of the renovation and it does look a lot better. Also putting in new sockets as they did not have many in the old days.

The steel beam in the top of that wall is a big barrier to hiding services. I have only exposed it so far in the living room, but didn’t have any wiring there so I’m not sure whether it would fit under the plasterboard. I did find that the top of the wall where the steel beam was was thicker than the wall lower down so I ended up overboarding to make it vertical. That could help give a bit more thickness to hide the wiring.

Ed


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Ed (Senior Member)
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23/07/2018 1:02 pm  

Here’s a photo of how the gas pipe to the cooker and the electrical wiring avoid it:-

bisf house gas pipe


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Ed (Senior Member)
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23/07/2018 1:02 pm  

Hi all, thought I’d post here even though it’s about lighting not ring mains as I didn’t want to make a new post for a small topic.

I’ve been redoing the wiring in the loft. Originally all the upstairs lights and switches (except the pull cord switches) were wired into two junction boxes next to the loft hatch. There were many wires in each terminal and it was hard to work out what was going on (even worse after I managed to jam the loft lighting in as well).

So I’ve replaced them with two Surewire prewired junction boxes. Each one has two power in/out connectors and four independent light and switch connections which makes everything a lot neater and simpler (and safer).

Ed


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Ed (Senior Member)
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23/07/2018 1:05 pm  

Before (white cables are the loft lights I had added in)

bisf house junction box wiring


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Ed (Senior Member)
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23/07/2018 1:06 pm  

After, rewired with the Surewire junction boxes (can see new central heating pipes and condensate drain)

bisf house wiring


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Admin
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23/07/2018 1:10 pm  

Thanks for uploading your images Ed.

During the renovation process of my own property, I had cause to remove the old fibre board ceiling.

Imagine my excitement when I was suddenly confronted with a dozen or so junction boxes sitting under the floorboards.

It was like junction box city. 

 


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PaigeLewis
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21/08/2018 6:42 am  

Thansk for sharing the images Ed.


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