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My BISF House Bathroom Refurbishment Project  

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My bathroom was first refurbished in 2005 following my retirement from the Police service. At that time, cream was a very fashionable colour leading me to deck my bathroom out in large format cream wall tiles along with a few mosaics to break up the area.

At the time I thought it was pretty cool but 12 years later I hated it and came to the conclusion that it all had to go.

During winter last year, I set out to update the bathroom completely. 

Those of you who have seen some of my other projects already know that I do like minimalistic, modern styling.  This is partly due to my previous house being a large Victorian cottage, built in 1898. At that time, I chose to retain as many of the original features of the house as possible and the home was decorated and dressed in a Victorian theme, using original Victorian ornaments and antiques.

After living with this rather dark, oppressive Victorian styling for several years I decided that my next property would be bright, modern and very minimalistic.

So that’s why I have chosen this type of styling which I understand is not to everyones taste.

Sadly I don’t have many images of the old bathroom but I did manage to find a couple that may give you an idea of how it looked after the 2005 refurb.

bisf house bathroom project (31)
bisf house bathroom project (30)

The 2016/17 project.

The first task involved ripping up the old floor tiles. I thought it would be an easy job but it turned out to be a lot harder than anticipated. The old tiles had been laid onto a plywood sheet which had been screwed firmly down into the floorboards. Upon removing the old tiles and the super strong adhesive I found the original screwheads filled with rock like tile adhesive making it impossible to remove the screws with a screwdriver. The only way to remove the screws was by angle grinder and sheer brute force.

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Once the floor had been removed the old wall tiles were next for removal but I soon found large chunks of the old plasterboard coming away with the tiles. There was no option but to re-board the entire room once the tiles had been removed.

tile removal
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Next was the installation of sound insulation inside the wall cavities adjoining the rear bedroom and into the wall facing the landing. I wanted increase privacy in the bathroom through sound insulation for obvious reasons. For this, I fitted mineral fibre sound insulation which came on a large roll, purchased from Wickes D.I.Y. It was simple to cut and was easily pushed into the wall cavities.

 

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I also started to install the pipework inside the wall cavity to accommodate a built in shower but, that idea eventually went out of the window due to a number of problems I had with the shower and pipe fittings…… Let’s just say that cheaper isn't always better.

 For the drywall, I didn’t use anything specifically waterproof but I did fit moisture resistant plasterboard which I found to be sufficient for my needs.

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Here's a few images of the original wall structure and steel frame located inside the wall cavity.

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Then came tile selection and having used subway tiles on my outhouse toilet project I chose to use similar tiles but in a different layout. Instead of installing them in a traditional brick pattern, I thought I would try and use a stack bond layout instead.

The last image in the gallery shows one of the completed stack bond walls.

bisf house bathroom refurbishment (8)
bisf house bathroom refurbishment (5)
bisf house bathroom refurbishment (2)
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I also wanted to fit a recessed mirrored cupboard into my wall but couldn't find a suitable cabinet that was wide enough. As an alternative, I purchased a much cheaper, shallow, vertical stainless steel wall cabinet instead which I could adapt to fit horizontally.

I already knew that my existing wall cavity would be too shallow to accommodate my new cabinet but I got around this by restudding the entire wall which would increase the depth of my cavity by around 20 cm, enough to allow my cabinet to sit inside the wall. 

Sadly I don't have any images of the new stud wall being built or any showing the new cavity in which the cupboard sat but here is an image of the early stages of fitting the cabinet into the void. The piece of wood that you see was just a temporary support.

cupboard install

You can also see that I had also fitted a hidden cistern into the rear wall in order to give me a little more space in the room.

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recessed cupboard
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Charlf
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Look great! Where did you get the mirror cabinet?

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