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Ed (Senior Member)
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Hi all,

just a quick update on the living room renovation which is now almost complete. I just thought I'd share my attempts to insulate the wooden window reveal - not sure if this is the right term, but the wooden frame that surrounds the window opening.

Once I'd finished rebuilding and insulating the wall I realised that there is still a big air gap behind that wooden reveal. Basically that roughly 15mm thick piece of wood is the only insulation between the room and the outside world. Because of the cold there, condensation forms on the wood next to the window frame leading to mould growth (the only place where it's a problem in the house). You can see it's been a long term problem because the paint was flaking away in the corner from persistent damp.

To try and solve the problem, I have drilled holes about 15mm in diameter roughly 150mm apart in the reveal and injected expanding foam into the gap. Fingers crossed it will fix the problem!

You can also see some of our new red and yellow colour scheme and the newly exposed floor (though the colour cast from the lighting is horrible!)

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Ed (Senior Member)
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admin: Ed, Another first class installation Ed, the front room window wall looks very neat and tidy. What thickness Celotex Kingspan did you use on the wall?Also you mentioned that the underside window batten had bowed, has it got vertical studding resting on either side that may have caused this due to movement / weight?Very nice piece of G-Plan! I'm really looking forward to seeing the design theme come together as I'm a big fan of retro :0)

Hi Marc, I've just realised I never replied to your post! I used 70mm Celotex/Kingspan behind the studwork and then 50mm in the gaps between the studwork. Ideally I think 70mm is a bit too thick, but I had it already either left over from upstairs or bought before I removed the original lining. I hadn't realised there would be less room than upstairs because the thickness of the render is on the inside not the outside.

Above the window the original woodwork was only attached to the steel uprights on either side and to the window surround/reveal below and probably relied on the plasterboard to keep it all rigid, but i've managed to pull the window surround up and straighten it out by bolting the new studwork onto the steel upright above the window which had a convenient and unused hole (maybe it was meant to be used originally?).

The room looks a lot smarter and more contemporary, but still with a BISF flavour I think!

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Trish
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Hi fellow BISF dwellers, this is my first post.We live in a BISF house in Essex, which we bought 8 years ago from the original family who were allocated it in 1947 (they bought it under right to buy and made a fortune!)It has had a fair few alterations over the years, so I'll start at the top!The roof is of the sheet metal tile boards type - done by the council years ago. Also the metal upper floor has been reinsulated and covered in UPVC weatherboards.When we moved in the flue was cut off in the ground floor, but we have subsequently removed all of it and gained extra space in our front bedroom. There was no sign of the quilted liner that I have read about, but it was lucky we did it as it was just balanced on some wood, apart from the metal strap! The chimney stack is still there at roof level and has been made watertight.Our loft has been boarded in its entire length and width and reinsulated. The firm that did it used battens over the top of the existing framework, stuffed it with insulation, then put the boards on top. We also had a new ladder fitted.On the upper floor we had a new fitted bedroom put in, we've had new ceiling pretty much throughout the house, and a new bathroom. The cupboard in the small bedroom is gone, as are the drawers, but the base has been reduced to the absolute minimum it can go. We have number 2 son's bunk bed fitted over that, so we now have quite a decent sized room.We replaced the glass lighters above the doors with a new glass, which is laminated and partially frosted with a star pattern.All the upstair rooms remain the original size. Like i said the flue is gone, and we gained extra space. The cupboard next to it is the airing cupboard and contains the hot water tank. The other cupboard is no longer there and is now extra space in the back bedroom.Downstairs - we have a porch which we want to replace with a brick built one. The lounge no longer cuts through to the dining room, and the kitchen and dining room have been knocked through to make a massive galley kitchen with a desk for the computer at the far end.Where the back window was, the previous occupants knocked it out and buit an extension. In there we have our dining table, a sideboard and a sofa. It has french doors onto the garden.The side building was in a right mess. We had the original roof removed and replaced with a timber one coated in a good thick felt. We had a hand basin put in the toilet area, and the whole area re tiled. We had the roof space insulated and then a proper ceiling put in. We had the walls insulated and an internal plaster studwork applied to the external walls. We had the whole electrical system replaced and the gas pipes re routed. We now have a really good utility room with radiator, washing machine, tumble drier, fridge freezer, and a large half depth kitchen unit. Prior to the electrics being done there was no ring main apparently, it was all on spurs.The front garden has been partially converted to off street parking.There is still much work to do , but we find our BISF house is ideal for a growing family.If anybody is interested I may try posting some pictures in a few days time.

Hello Mr Spock welcome!

Wow your house sounds great and you have done so much to it too. I like the sound of a fully boarded loft and it would be great if you could share some piccies with us.
I keep trying to get my other half to board ours but he says its too difficult lol He just doesn't want to get up there me thinks.
How did you remove your flue, as ours sounds just like how yours was, there is still half of it left in our house running through the bedroom into the loft. I have no idea whats holding it up!

I'd love to have a utility outside and yours sounds perfect as there isn't much room in the kitchen as it stands. It would be great having the washer outside.
I think our electrics are all connection boxes, circular plastic things in the ceilings, I do think we should get them changed. Did having a rewire cause much disruption in the house?

Looking forward to hearing back from you.

Trish :0)

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Ed (Senior Member)
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Hi Marc, you said you'd like to see how I redecorated the living room so here's a before/after photo. I'll post some more when everything is done, it still needs some new curtains and a few more things.

Ed

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Hi Ed, I've just been browsing through some of our older posts from earlier discussions that we had. It still amazes me how much work you completed in a short time including the transformation of your living room shortly after you moved in to your house. I really do love the 50's furniture and the design style that fits in perfectly with your home. I've edited one to black and white and reposted it below. Apart from the modern electricals, it looks just like those original early images of furnishings inside the newly built houses. Fantastic!

Ed's BISF Living room in Black & White

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Stacy Carter
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I always look forward for home improvement. I have done kitchen renovation by hiring kitchen renovation San Jose team.

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