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Do you live in a System Built or BISF House? - Share your thoughts memories with the community!  

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Sindy Harris
Posts: 5
 Sindy Harris
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(@Sindy Harris)
Joined: 8 years ago

Wow Liz

I think your house is lush, it looks amazing already and you haven't even finished yet 🙂

How on earth do you keep it so clean, i can only guess what the dust must have been like with all the workers in there.

I am amazed at how big it all looks and i really like the way you have split up the kitchen and made it open plan. It was such a good idea to take away some of the hallway too. i hardly ever use mine.

Those kitchen units look new lol are you having white ones again?

I love white everything but i am a bit of a bleach queen lol

Thank you for sharing your photos they are brilliant and I'd love to see some of the old ones.

I think mark is right, this should be on your own page.

Well done I luurve it 🙂

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1 Reply
Liz
 Liz
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(@Liz)
Joined: 8 years ago

Posts: 21

Hi Sindy

When we had the work done the dust was horrendous. It didn't help that I was around during the day when it was all going on. My dog was also a puppy at the time so it wasn't a great time.

At one point we had a long trench dug out in the hall where they were putting gas pipes in, no proper ceilings, just bare dark horrible wood (see previous photos), tools all over the place, exposed walls and a constant supply of dust! It was awful - I can't lie! I had had enough of the mess, the upheaval and the workmen if I'm honest. 6 weeks is a long time to have them in your house. But it was worth it in the end. The space is incredible and the pictures do not depict the actually size and space we have achieved just by knocking a few walls down!

Before we had this work done we had a dark dining room which we only ate it in the evening so it wasn't really being used. The long lean-to extension at the back of the house was just used as a dumping ground and didn't really serve a purpose.

These houses have so much potential and so much can be done to them.

Quite a few years ago we took some of the back bedroom and extended the bathroom. It really makes a difference to the bathroom because the original bathroom is so small, now it is a good size, but still leaves a double bedroom at the back. I think this is something worth considering if you haven't already done so.

Liz

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Andy P
Posts: 1
 Andy P
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(@Andy P)
Joined: 8 years ago

Great website, I wish this site was around when I purchased my house!!!!

It's a goldmine of info for every bisf owner, I really enjoyed reading all the updates and articles.

Well done everyone and really like Dentons bedroom too, it looks real funky and modern!!!!

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callko
Posts: 1
 callko
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(@callko)
Joined: 8 years ago

Hi All,
Just bought an Airey terraced property at auction this week and am looking to do a full repair and extension on the back, plus fully ut the inside as its pretty derelict inside. Going to be a huge project and not too sure where to start with who can do the repair to the licensed scheme. I am in Lancashire and the property will become our family home and so any help will be greatly appreciated from you all!

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2 Replies
 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago

Posts: 0

Hi, I'm not sure there are many similarities between an Airey house and a BISF house other than they're both of non-traditional construction. A BISF house has a steel frame, I'm not too familiar with an Airey house but gather that it's made from pre-cast concrete sections. Without ever having seen an Airey house I'm not sure what BISF-related information is going to be useful for it.

I believe that an Airey house is more problem-prone than a BISF house, so you might need to be more careful with the work you do.

Around here and amongst the BISF houses there are quite a lot of Cornish houses, which are another type of pre-cast concrete house. About half have been demolished and the rest mostly have been rebuilt with reconstituted Bath stone. They used massive jacks to hold the house up while they removed the PRC panels one at a time before rebuilding the walls with traditional masonry.

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BISF Admin
Admin
(@bisfadmin)
Joined: 9 years ago

Noble Member
Posts: 1106

Hi Callko

Warmest of welcomes to BISF House.

We are geared toward BISF houses here which involve different construction methods to Airey houses.

We will always try to help out if you come across any problems.

I would suggest giving Paul a ring at Regent Maintenance as his company undertake repairs to a variety of non-traditional houses which may include the PRC Airey type. He has a lot of experience in renovations and he may be able to assist you.

There are a number of inherent defects that will probably need to be tackled. They usually relate to the steel inside the pre-cast concrete as Ed has already outlined as well as a number of other issues. As you may well already know they are classed as defective under the housing act 1985 but in the past large government grants have been available in order to bring them up to standard and certified.

Paul Leer is the director of Regent. The company web page is here http://www.regentmaintenance.co.uk/contact.html

I hope this helps 🙂

I do have some research material stored deep on my hard drive that I will try to dig out for you.

Marc

I hope this helps

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chrissymary
Posts: 2
 chrissymary
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(@chrissymary)
Joined: 8 years ago

Hi I have lived in my BISF house nearly all my life I am 63 I was born here bought the house back in 1988, but now cause of age, aching knees I want to sell it and move to a bungalow everyone that comes falls in love with it they are so big and roomy but the thing that keeps coming up is some form of repair certificate I do not have this and the fact the type of build it is. I feel sad as apart from spending a lot of money on this property it is a great family home. Cannot find any form of certificate these proposed purchasers lenders want has anyone got any ideas,

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BISF Admin
Admin
(@bisfadmin)
Joined: 9 years ago

Noble Member
Posts: 1106

Hello ChrissyMary

Firstly may I welcome you to BISF House and I am so sorry to hear that you are experiencing health problems with your knees as I know how painful that can be.

From what describe regarding the certificate, it sounds very much to me that whoever you are trying to deal with in order to sell your property has wrongly classified your home as a PRC house which is indeed defective under the housing act and does require a certificate to prove that it has been repaired to the required standard.

Your house if it is indeed a BISF house is not defective under the housing act and requires no certification whatsoever. If your home is a BISF house I would suggest that you try another estate agency that has experience with BISF properties as they will be able to give you far better advice.

That leads me to ask you the following questions.

Is your home a BISF house or a PRC house such as a Airey, Unity or Woolaway house?
Can you tell me what general area you live in or the first the digits of your postcode so that I can check for you if you are unsure?

If you would rather speak with me directly you can always e-mail me at admin@bisfhouse.com and I will do my very best to assist you.

I look forward to your reply.

Marc 🙂

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 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago

Posts: 0

Hi Chrissymary, I'm sorry to hear you feel you have to sell your house due to ill-health. The previous owner of my house lived here from when it was built in 1949 till his death last year. I agree with what you say about it, I immediately liked the size and layout and it has a very homely and comforting feel - new enough to be convenient but old enough to have some character. I find it a lot more appealing than newer houses that are often boxy and older ones that are not so homely with inconvenient layouts.

I think Marc is right about the certificate - a lot of people seem to confuse BISF houses with pre-cast reinforced concrete panel (PRC) houses that were found to be defective and in need of repair. It's a bit puzzling because they look very different - around here there are actually BISF and PRC houses next door to each other like these three pairs of Cornish houses sandwiched between BISFs:

If it's the buyer who wants to see the certificate you should explain to them that a BISF house does not need a repair certificate. My estate agent never said anything about BISF when I bought the house, just that it had a steel frame - I had to identify the type by looking on the internet.

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Posts: 0
 Anonymous
Joined: 50 years ago

Hi Marc, I'm very pleased with the find! The hallway does indeed have quarry tiles under the carpet, but they're not very nice and quite uneven (more like outdoor type tiles) so I think those will stay covered.

At the moment we're decorating the dining room with two walls in a deep red and two in pale yellow and it does give a very nice 1950s look with the parquet floor!

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