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Hi

I am currently in the process of buying a steel-framed house and had a Homebuyers survey done on the property. After advice from the surveyor, I am now looking to upgrade to a Buildings survey to inspect the steel frame.

As part of survey, we are paying for a builder to accompany the surveyor to remove some bricks (and then replace them) to inspect the stanchions at two corners of the house.

My questions are:
1) Is this standard for a steel-frame inspection? Our seller seems annoyed that we have requested this.
2) If no corrosion is found, what is the likelihood of it developing whilst we live there? And if it did develop – how much would it cost to repair something like this?

Am I getting really worried about the complexity of this house and feeling maybe I should pull out of purchasing it altogether…

Thank you

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HI Rachel
it is typical with majority of steel framed houses to request an invasive survey where a small part of the interior or exterior wall is removed to provided visual inspection to the steel frame.

Corner stanchions are often checked because if significant corrosion is likely to be found anywhere it would usually appear on the corners.
In most cases a small hole is made which can easily be repaired but you stated that the builder is going to remove some bricks, hence the question is it a BISF house or a house of different construction?

If no corrosion is found it is very unlikely that you will suffer corrosion in the future providing that the house is well maintained.

I wouldn’t personally see this a reason to pull out of the sale, I prefer to think of it being better to be safe than sorry.

I hope this helps

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