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Hi my name is john ive just bought a bisf house in hornchurch plumton avenue im at the point of were I have removed all plaster board and hard board so now im wanting to insalate walls is there any reason why I should not go over original insalation with wool insalation

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Yes I will take some photos at the moment the house is just a shell every wAll and ceiling is down if there is any particular thing u wanted photographed then let me know
many thanks john

  • Admin

    Just take as many shots as you can John, a few close ups of the framework and the bare outer walls visible from inside the cavity would be great,

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Hello marc
have you removed your flue from your house and if so please could you tell me the best and safest way thanx john

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Hello marc thank u for your reply and the information. With the the lack of airflow could condesation corse any other promlems apart from the steel frame

  • Admin

    That’s a tough one to answer John as I have heard rumours of damp appearing on the inner walls but I have not witnessed this myself. There are also reports of others who say they have had no problem.
    Take a look at this post if you haven’t seen it already , it’s a complete strip down of the entire house.
    http://bisfhouse.com/bisf-strip-down-a-must-see-gallery/

    In short, air is drawn into the cavity through vents at ground level, the air travels straight up to the roof space which is also heavily vented, this is why if you are in the loft on a windy day you can feel the air blowing around the loft space.
    This is also why you should never expose the insulation to a naked flame as fire could travel up through the inside of the cavity (fueled by the excellent supply of air) and ignite insulation in the loft space itself. So please, always take care if you ever use a flame such as when welding pipes etc.
    You need to devise a method of filling the cavity with the quilt but stopping it from making contact with the outer wall.

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John,
Just a thought before you start insulating. Please remember that all steel framed buildings require a ventilated cavity to allow a through flow of air around the steel frame to prevent condensation building up around the steel frame which can lead to corrosion.

In simple terms, this means that you can’t just stuff the cavity full of insulation and board over with plasterboard, this is why the old quilting is pretty thin and encapsulated in brown paper, because this still allows air to circulate.

It is far better to fit solid insulation boards into the cavity, making sure that an air gap is maintained between the boards and outer skin of the house. However this will be much harder to achieve if you do plan to use glass quilting, as the quilt will slump forward and in effect block the flow or air.

I know that glass quilt is much cheaper than insulation boards but it is by far the better option as otherwise you could face problems when selling the house in the future as any good surveyor will pick up on this as a major problem.

You can still use glass fibre insulation but you will need to devise a way of fitting it whereby it does not fill the entire cavity or use solid insulation panels of the right thickness and spacers to again prevent the panel from connecting with the outer wall and blocking the air gap.

Marc

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Hi John and welcome to our website.

In the majority of cases most people find it easier to insulate the cavities by removing the old wool insulation simply because it gives you more space in which to insert the new insulation.

One of our long standing members, Ed has previously written a very informative post in which he insulates one of his rooms, in this case a bedroom and I think you will find the post really helpful.

Ed bedroom insulation project

It would be great too if you could take some before and after photographs of your own project and share them with us here. We are particularly interested in seeing images of stripped down walls from different regions of the country, so that we can compare the build methods between buildings.

Let us know how you get on.

Marc

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