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Is it possible to move the window frame in the dining room? I want to remove the window and add in french doors as many people have done, however within the dining room, the window is not central in the room and sits up against the kitchen wall. I was hoping to move the window sideways so that it is in the middle of the wall, but I’m not sure if the steel structure will allow this. Does anyone have any experience of this, or any pictures of the exposed frame?

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Here’s a Few images for now and I hope to post the rest shortly, perhaps in a new post on the main page.

If you look at the edge of the new opening you will see the stanchions that Ed mentoined earlier.

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Hi Hurdy and welcome to our community!

Ed has given you the perfect response in relation to positioning of the window frame and restrictions due to the location of stanchions.

If it helps though, I recently removed a living window along with my my good friend Mat and we replaced it with a set of pre-made patio doors.

I’ll try my best to dig out the pictures and include it in a post for you but untill then here’s a few of the images that may assist you.

Marc

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Here’s a photo of a BISF house under refurbishment. The steel framework has been painted green. The hole with the yellow patterned wallpaper inside is where the dining room window was and the kitchen window was where the tiles are visible. I believe this is the less common variant found mainly in Scotland which originally contained two maisonettes rather than a single house on each side. This accounts for the different layout in the kitchen area (there is not normally a wall where those tiles are). Also the house is half a bay longer and the party wall is between two stanchions rather than aligned with a stanchion. However the way the windows are fitted in between the stanchions is the same.

Ed

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Hi, on each side of the window there is a steel stanchion (vertical C-section column) that supports the first floor, roof etc and holds the window in place. This is the same for each window in the house. Therefore it could not be done without replacing/strengthening the steel structure around the new opening which would probably not be practical. I would also imagine it would look a little odd to have the French windows out of alignment with the bedroom window above.

Removing the wall below the window is not a problem apart from the render being pretty tough. Our neighbours have done this and I don’t think it’s a problem that the door is not in the centre of the room. They have sliding doors and usually open the side that is near the centre of the room leaving the side that is up against the kitchen closed.

Ed

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