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Hey again all,

I’m going through the process of this new GDHIF external walls and boiler opportunity at the moment’ which is all signed off and ready to go, as soon as I’ve had the windows and roof nstalled that is. I have a question that I’m hoping someone can answer first though. With the e.w.I and system added to the walls it brings the walls out around 150mm-200mm on the outside, which I think gives the windows a bit of a ‘sunk into the house look’. Question is can I have the new windows installed into the tapered window surrounds so that they are flush with(or near as) the face of the steel surround so not to have such a ‘sunk inwards look’. I have my window quotes starting from this evening so any answers would be great thanks. Also has anyone got a cross-section image of one of these b.I.s.f window surrounds I could view please? Thanks again.

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Ideally you’d use something like this: http://www.fitshow.co.uk/exhibitors/sfs-intec/armed_for_the_extra_load

I’m not sure if this would be practical on a BISF house, but you may be able to attach it into the galvanised steel surrounds where the original windows were bolted or screwed in.

Ed

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Hi Deano,

ideally when fitting windows with EWI, the window should be fitted into the EWI zone rather than into the original wall, ie the window should be moved out slightly. This eliminates any uninsulated reveal and avoids a mean sunken window look. This would be done with special metal straps I believe, but I’m not sure whether this would be practical with a BISF house. Basically the straps hold the window out in front of the original wall, and then the insulation is filled round it.

The local housing association have done some of their houses here and what they have done is to install insulation out flush with the living room window surround (which protrudes more than the others) and then glue some sort of white decorative capping onto the steel frame to visually recreate the surround. I could see this after some of the storms we had when some of the capping blew off! Upstairs though the windows are quite sunken and I believe smaller as they’ve covered the steel surrounds and it looks a bit mean in my opinion.

Purely personal opinion, but I think the surrounds round the windows improve the look of the house as without them the whole appearance is too plain as the house is such a simple design it relies on a few features for interest like the window surrounds and different texture/colour cladding upstairs.

Ed

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Lastly before I have to attend a meeting, here are some window frame images, They show the first floor but the structure is pretty much the same.

[gallery columns="4" ids="11964,11965,11966,11967"]
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This image shows how the insulation panels have rebates cut into them, so that the existing window frame is fully encompassed and insulated.

[caption id="attachment_11962" align="alignright" width="300"]View of insulation profile when used to incorporate existing frame. View of insulation profile when used to incorporate existing frame.[/caption]
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[gallery ids="11955,11956,11957,11958,11959,11960"]
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Hi Deano
Glad to hear that you are making good use of the Green Deal!
I can fully appreciate why you would like to get away from the typical recessed appearance of the windows however the galvanised surrounds have been engineered specifically to house a standard window frame and due to the tapered edges I think you run into problems trying to secure the units in the tapered recess.

The galvanised frame itself can be removed and a new slightly wider window can be fitted between the stanchions that run down each side of the existing window. You may need to add extra timer supports inside the top and bottom of the openings onto which the new frame can be secured. The EWI installers would then create new reveals leading into the edges of the new window frame.

I have also heard of some home owners simply angle grinding off the box profile galvanised frame leaving the inner casement still intact but I have not undertaken this myself.

As for the EWI
There are a number of ways in which EWI installers incorporate the frames.
Some installers use a specially moulded and sometimes pre-insulated casement frame cover (which can be expensive), that sits on top of the existing frame to prevent thermal bridging. Other companies simply leave the existing frame in place believing that there is little risk of thermal bridging due to the way the surrounding frame was constructed and place the EWI up to the edge of the frame, The two methods above can use slimmer EWI insulation panels to achieve this.
The third and most commonly used method is to insulate the walls to a level that slightly protrudes the frame, whereby the frame is also insulated and rendered and a new reveal created up to the edge of the window.

I will post some images below which will give you a better idea.

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